Our Trademark

  • The trade mark belongs to the Swedish Jam Making Association

  • Standards are determined by members of the Swedish Jam Making Association.

  • The trademark can only be used by members of the Association who have passed examinations that demonstrate their knowledge and level of skill. Examinations take place twice a year and are open to anyone who feels they have sufficient skill.

  • All who have the right to use the Äkta Sylt trademark have signed a declaration that they are aware of the rules and commit themselves to developing their knowledge and craft skills.

  • Any jam made by members working within the rules may carry the Äkta Sylt trademark on its label..

Production

  • Äkta Sylt is made in batches of 3 to 4 kilos in copper preserving pans, preferably on a gas cooker.

  • Äkta Sylt will never contain the following:

- Industrially produced thickening agents such as pectin or seed flour.

- Preserving agents 

Citric acid or other industrially produced acidity regulators.

  • Äkta Sylt may be flavoured with natural flavourings and spices
  • Äkta Sylt must be made from locally processed raw materials.
  • Fruit purees may be bought in and added as flavourings but not used as the principal raw ingredient.

Försäljning

  • The Swedish Jam-making Association has a special range of Äkta Sylt called Utvalt - Select - which is sold through the Association.

  • This range Utvalt is chosen by a special craft committee appointed by the Association's Executive Committee.
  • All member jam-makers may sell the Äkta Sylt jam they make to their own customers.
  • The Swedish Jam-making Association gives priority to a limited number of retailers who are actively supported by the Association.
  • The jam-makers' own farm shops may retail the Utvalt range.
 

Äkta Sylt is always a handmade product. It is made in batches of 3 to 4 kilos in copper preserving pans following the French jam-making tradition. The reasons for this small-scale production are:

  • Jam must be brought rapidly to the boil to release the pectin. Copper conducts heat better than stainless steel. The different cooking times are important to get the pectin to gel.
  • Larger batches take longer to bring to the boil. Experience tells us that a batch of 3-4 kilos is the ideal weight of berries or fruit to obtain the very best results.
  • Cooking time depends in part on how long it takes the fruit to come to the boil, and in part on how much water needs to evaporate to reach the correct consistency. Experienced jam-makers use their skills - and a thermometer - to judge the precise moment when a batch is ready.
  • If the jam is overcooked, it becomes rubbery and the sugar caramelises. A well made jam should have the right consistency and its flavour and colour should be true to the raw materials.

Jam making is a method of preserving, in which the raw material is boiled with sugar. Jam has its own purity rules.


Äkta Sylt is made from carefully selected raw materials. Production in small batches of no more than 3 to 4 kilos with careful quality control means there is no need for industrial pectin, preserving agents or citric acid to reach the proper consistency and the required keeping qualities.

 

For this reason Äkta Sylt needs no chemical additives. When berries and fruit are cooked correctly pectin is released from the cell-walls. This makes the jam gel and thicken.

 

The standards set by the National Food Administration demand that jam should consist of a minimum of 35% of fresh fruit or berries. Excepting red or black currants, rowanberries, sea buckthorn, rosehips and quince, where the required minimum is 25%.


Äkta Sylt follows stricter rules which regulate "special jam" and "special marmalade." These require that 45% of the jam should consist of fruit or berries or any other raw materials. In the case of red or black currants and similar, the minimum is 35%.

 

Uncooked jams and other alternatives
Lingonberries and cloudberries are examples of soft fruit which naturally contain enough pectin not to need cooking. It is enough to mix them with the sugar. Other fruit and berries can also be used in uncooked jams, but their keeping properties do not give them a long life and therefore they cannot be called preserves.

 

It is possible to limit the amount of sugar used by adding grated fruit and mixing raw fruit and berries with sugar. This, however, demands that the jam is made in very small batches, and that raw materials are kept frozen. Grated apple is lovely in porridge. If you cook it with a little sugar, you can make a crisp apple sauce. Mix that with some frozen summer fruit and your pancakes will be delicious
 

Lingonberries and cloudberries are examples of soft fruit which naturally contain enough pectin not to need cooking. It is enough to mix them with the sugar. Other fruit and berries can also be used in uncooked jams, but their keeping properties do not give them a long life and therefore they cannot be called preserves.


It is possible to limit the amount of sugar used by adding grated fruit and mixing raw fruit and berries with sugar. This, however, demands that the jam is made in very small batches, and that raw materials are kept frozen. Grated apple is lovely in porridge. If you cook it with a little sugar, you can make a crisp apple sauce. Mix that with some frozen summer fruit and your pancakes will be delicious.

 

Jam or marmalade?

Jam and marmalade are made the same way. Traditionally marmalade is made from citrus fruit with high levels of acidity and pectin, which provides a firmer consistency. In the United Kingdom marmalade is only made from citrus fruit; everything else is called jam.


In Sweden too, jam and marmalade have different consistencies. Berries normally used for jam making, such as strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, and cloudberries have a higher water content and lower levels of pectin and acids, which gives the jam a runnier consistency.

 

The consistency is not always very different, and it is the mainly the use to which the product is put that determines whether a jar contains jam or marmalade. Marmalade is usually eaten on bread, often with cheese. Jam is used for fillings, sauces or desserts

 

 

Jam has its own romance. The dream lives on about the well-stocked larder, filled with rows of jars of home-made pickles and preserves. Not least of which are jams, jars with nostalgic labels and gingham covers over the lids.


This dream trips many jam buyers up, as there are many jam businesses that use this romantic vision to sell mediocre industrial jam. The jars conjure up the dream larder and longing for idyllic times with children waiting impatiently for their waffles and pancakes.

 

This is to sponge off our craft skills and it upsets us real jam makers. That is why we do not produce any adorable jars any more. For us, making jam is not something that we do for fun in our spare time - it is a proper profession. We are convinced that a Swiss roll with jam is lovely on a Friday night, but with all our hearts we say no to pretence around jam. Our fight for Real Jam is directed against the unreal jam that sponges off us.

 

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